Tag Archives: crochet along

CAL Check-In: Faux Fade Wrap Crochet Along: Progress Photos, Non-Wool Yarn Ideas, and Color Palettes
Janine models her Faux Fade Crochet wrap available from crochet.com

Hi Crochet-Alongers! How are you progressing on your Faux Fade Wrap, our current WeCrochet CAL? If you’d like to join (or just get caught up on all the CAL details), go here to find the Faux Fade Wrap Crochet Along information.

By now, you should have already chosen your fade colors and made a swatch, and possibly already started your shawl! Let’s check in on a few people to see how they are doing.

Zoey’s Faux Fade Shawl

Zoey is our digital graphic designer (responsible for all our pretty downloadable calendar wallpapers, WeCrochet emails, and other goodies), and she’s a beginner crocheter who decided to jump in and join the Faux Fade Shawl CAL.

First, she had to choose her color palette! She was thinking a dark red & black palette, (inspired by Freddy Kreuger’s sweater!), so I helped her figure out what colors to use.

A Red and Olive-striped Freddy Kreuger sweater paired with five balls of Palette yarn in dark gray, gray twist, dark red, tomato red, and olive.

She settled on these Palette Fingering yarn colors: Black, Asphalt Heather, Asphalt Twist, Garnet Heather, Tomato, and Larch Heather.

CAL TIP: We also decided that even though this pattern is simple, it is really helpful to have a stitch marker to mark which side you need to do the increases on, since you only increase on one side of the shawl.

That’s all the progress we have to report so far on Zoey’s shawl, but check back in later for more.

Producer Sarah’s Faux Fade Wrap

Six balls of Palette yarn in mustard, rouge, tan, brown, sage green, and navy, along with a small triangular crochet swatch and a hook.

Producer Sarah is also working on the Faux Fade Wrap. Her project page on Ravelry says: “I don’t have the exact yarns that the pattern calls for so I’m not sure I’ll do the fade effect. I just have single cakes of Palette. Might just do stripes.”

So far, it’s looking pretty cool, Producer Sarah!

WeCrochet Ravelry Group CAL WIPs:

A pink fade crochet swatch atop a box of bright orange, red, and pink mini skeins of Palette yarn.

Skeeleyma on Ravelry has a Palette Minis Sampler Box to play with! She started with this pink fade, but decided to frog and go with a more Autumnal palette, and it’s looking NICE (check out more pics on her Ravelry project page):

A Faux Fade shawl crochet swatch that fades from brown to orange to brighter orangey-pink.

Then SheThatKnits on Ravelry has a really pretty color palette started, in a steely blue-gray array:

Five balls of Palette yarn in blue-grays.

Non-Wool Yarn Alternatives?

A blog comment box that says: "Would be really nice if you could provide at least one wool-free yarn in the kit builder. Some of us are truly allergic, and others are vegan, so having an option would provide more opportunities for people to join the CAL. Also, because I don't have the pattern or issue 4 of WeCrochet (yet), I can't look for my own yarn because I don't know how much to buy."

Heather replies: "Thanks for this feedback. Great points! I will pass this along to the team. As for yardage, you need 1848 total yards. You can also buy the pattern by itself here (link)."

We got a comment from SusieKrochets, who made a great point — what about those who don’t want to use wool yarn?

“Would be really nice if you could provide at least one wool-free yarn in the kit builder. Some of us are truly allergic, and others are vegan, so having an option would provide more opportunities for people to join the CAL. Also, because I don’t have the pattern or issue 4 of WeCrochet (yet), I can’t look for my own yarn because I don’t know how much to buy.”

I did pass this feedback along to the team, as something for us to think about in future CALs and kits! So what about people who want to use a non-wool yarn for this project?

Because this is made of single crochet stitches, I bet the drape won’t be adversely affected by switching fibers, so you can definitely use a non-wool fingering weight yarn of your choice for this. (Results will vary when you switch up a fiber, but that’s all part of the joy of crochet, dontcha think?). You might want to play around with hook sizes and swatching to make sure the shawl results in a drape that you like.

First though, let’s figure out the yarn QUANTITIES you need for this shawl. The Faux Fade Shawl pattern calls for 1848 total yards of fingering weight yarn

Using Palette, you need:
1 ball lightest color (231 yards)
1 ball light color (231 yards)
2 balls medium color (462 yards)
2 balls darker color (462 yards)
2 ball darkest color (462yards)
= 8 balls total

So you can use those numbers to work out what you will need when you substitute yarn for this pattern.

Here are some non-wool yarn ideas for this CAL:

Comfy Fingering

Twenty different colors of Comfy Fingering yarn.

With a large selection of colors, this yarn is a perfect cotton option for the Faux Fade Shawl. The blend of Pima cotton and acrylic fibers in Comfy Fingering make it easy to crochet, and it’s completely washable and easy-care.

Because this yarn comes in at slightly less yardage per ball of Palette (218 versus Palette’s 231 yards), you might want to buy extra balls of yarn, or just throw a single extra in for one of the colors (which should cover the difference, although it might affect where the color fades take place on the shawl.)

Here are a couple Comfy Fingering palettes you could try:

A color palette consisting of five balls of yarn in the following colors: Black, Blackberry, Lilac, Hollyberry, Whisker (gray)

A dark and deep Comfy Fingering palette.

A color palette consisting of five balls of yarn in the following colors: White, Whisker (gray), Black, Sea Foam (aqua), Peapod (bright green)

A light and bright Comfy Fingering palette.

Lindy Chain

Eight balls of Lindy Chain yarn in various colors.

Superbly lightweight and endlessly versatile, Lindy Chain is a chainette yarn that is just the thing for a warm weather version of the Faux Fade Wrap. It’s a linen-cotton blend. Available in 20 stunning shades that range from rich hues to soft pastels, this is a good plant-based fiber to try for this project.

This yarn has 180 yards per ball so you will definitely need to pick up an extra ball or two to make the full 1848 yards.

Here’s a color palette to try in Lindy Chain:

A color palette consisting of five balls of yarn in the following colors: Rouge (dark pink), Blush (light pink), Gosling (light gray), Ash (dark gray), and Black.

Deep pink fading to gray and then black is a romantic choice for the Faux Fade Wrap.

Alpaca Cloud Fingering

Four hanks of Alpaca Cloud Fingering Yarn

Finally, Alpaca Cloud Fingering IS an animal-based yarn (100% Superfine Alpaca), but it’s non-wool, so if a wool allergy is an issue, this yarn should do the trick. It is super-soft, has a lovely drape, and a nice array of colors to choose from.

Each hank has 200 yards, so pick up an extra hank to make sure you get the full 1848 yards.

This yarn line has a very lovely array of neutrals, so you can go with an understated neutral color palette:

A color palette consisting of five balls of yarn in the following colors: White, Cream, Tan, Light Gray, Dark Gray.

But this yarn line also has a lot of vibrant colors, so you can create a rainbow fade:

A color palette consisting of five balls of yarn in the following colors: Red, Gold-Orange, Yellow, Green, Blue.

I’m a color geek, so I could sit here all day generating potential color palettes for your Faux Fade Wraps!

A picture of Heather's face with a rainbow halo. Text that says: Absolutely Nobody: ....
Heather: HERE are some PALETTES for your CROCHET PROJECTS!

Absolutely Nobody: ….
Heather: HERE are some PALETTES for your CROCHET PROJECTS!

How is YOUR Faux Fade Wrap project going?

Now it’s your turn! How is your Faux Fade Wrap project going? What colors did you pick for your project? Are you finding the pattern simple, difficult, relaxing, or stressful? Let me know in the comments, or on social media with the hashtag #WeCrochetCAL.

If you haven’t joined yet but you would like to, there’s still time. Find out all the details for the CAL in our Faux Fade Wrap CAL Announcement post.


JOIN OUR CROCHET ALONG: Faux Fade Wrap (September-November 2020)
A woman holds a multicolored crocheted shawl that fades from dark brown to yellow to tan.

You are cordially invited to join us in our new Crochet Along Challenge, featuring the Faux Fade Wrap pattern by Janine Myska of Knits ‘n Knots.

Buy the pattern here: Faux Fade Wrap Pattern OR get it in WeCrochet Magazine Issue 4!

About the Faux Fade Wrap

A woman wears a multicolored brown-toned crocheted shawl wrapped around her neck.

This multi-colored faded wrap is made from a simple 2-row repeat, and uses just single crochet! The only technique you need to know is is how to work the color changes, but we promise – once you see how easy it is to do one row, it’s a breeze.

Get the Faux Fade Wrap Pattern.

Choose your Yarn:

We put together some Faux Fade Wrap Kits for you that include the pattern as well as the yarn you need to make it (along with a nice discount!). Here are the colors Janine pre-selected for us, inspired by the seasons of the year:

A woman holds a crocheted shawl that fades from dark brown to yellow to light brown. Along the right side are color suggestions for a spring color palette: pale pink, dusty rose, hot pink, light yellow, and gold.
The Spring Fade Pattern Kit features pinks and yellows.
A woman holds a crocheted shawl that fades from dark brown to yellow to light brown. Along the right side are color suggestions for a Summer color palette: peach, gold, coral, red-orange, and burgundy.
The Summer Fade Pattern Kit features oranges, coral, and reds.
A woman holds a crocheted shawl that fades from dark brown to yellow to light brown. Along the right side are color suggestions for an autumn color palette: tan, gold, brass, copper, and warm espresso brown.
The Autumn Fade Pattern Kit features yellows, copper, and browns.
A woman holds a crocheted shawl that fades from dark brown to yellow to light brown. Along the right side are color suggestions for a winter color palette: silver, gunmetal, cornflower, medium blue, and navy.
The Winter Fade Pattern Kit features grays and blues.

If none of these pattern kits are your thing, you can easily select your own colors (or other yarns) by using our Faux Fade Wrap Kit Builder (located at the bottom of the pattern page):

A screen shot of the Faux Fade Wrap Kit Builder

Just choose your yarn, and drag and drop the yarn colors you want into the kit builder and hit the purple “Add to Cart” button to instantly place the perfect amount of yarn into your cart.

How to Join the Crochet Along:

To participate in the Faux Fade Wrap Crochet Along, join and post here:

CAL Timeline:

A photo of the WeCrochet CAL Timeline - same as text below

September 1: Pick your Palette (or yarn), and order from crochet.com!

September 8: Join the WeCrochet Ravelry group and follow along in the Faux Fade Wrap CAL discussion.

September 15: Read through the pattern (in WeCrochet Magazine Issue 4) or buy it here: Faux Fade Wrap Pattern.

September 22: Make a swatch (and block it… righhhht??)

September 29: Work sections 1-4.

October 12: Work Sections 5-7.

October 26: Work Section 8.

November 10: Work Section 9.

November 24: Block the wrap and post pictures on social with #FauxFadeCAL.

We hope you’ll join us!


Light Touch CAL: Crocheting the Front & Back

Welcome back! I’m blogging through my progress on the Light Touch Pullover Crochet Along (CAL). Today I’ll talk about which yarn I chose for the project, as well as my progress on both the front and back of this lovely sweater. Read on!

A white cat snoozes behind a soft gray crochet swatch with a metal hook in it.

There is nothing I love more than a project that just flies off the hook! Right now, my Light Touch Pullover is that kind of project.

What Yarn Did I Choose?

After testing the 3 different options for yarn, I decided to go with Stroll for my sweater. It’s deliciously soft and is available in so many colors. I ultimately decided that Jack Rabbit Heather was the one for me. It’s a beautiful gray-brown that has just the slightest hint of a pale purple undertone. It’s a color I don’t currently have in my handmade wardrobe and it will pair beautiful with denim. I tend to wear jeans … a lot. So a color working with a denim is a must for wearability for me.

A wooden background with a half of a crocheted sweater in gray, accompanied by a ball of gray Stroll yarn and a metal crochet hook.
It took a few tries, but changing my hook size and blocking technique helped me achieve gauge. Getting started also took a few tries.

How Did I Get Gauge?

You might remember in my last post that I was struggling to reach gauge. My swatches kept growing larger than the recommended gauge in the pattern. I was able to solve this issue doing two things.

  • First, I went down a hook size which got me spot on to row gauge.
  • Then, I changed my style of blocking. Instead of wet blocking, I tried just lightly misting the piece with squirt bottle water, pinning to size, and allowing to dry. This worked like a dream and my finished project should fit just how I hope.

Starting the Back of the Pullover

This project starts by working the Back piece front the center out before moving on to the Front and Sleeves. It’s then finished by working the Neckline and Hem. This all seems straightforward, but I have a crafty confession to make; I had to restart this project three times. I struggled to count my stitches properly and being off by just one stitch will cause the lace repeat not to work out correctly. So, as you start your sweater, take the time to slow down, count your stitches, and don’t feel bad if you have to start again. You aren’t alone.

Apart from the beginning chain, there was only one other area that caused me to misstep. There are instructions at the end of Row 15 that tell you to attach a new yarn at the top of the turning chain of the same row and chain two stitches. I could not wrap my head around why the pattern called for this or what to do with the chains when I had them. I decided to go to the designer, Natasha Robarge, for help.

A wooden background with a blonde basket full of gray yarn on the right. The top half of a crocheted sweater in gray, accompanied by a metal crochet hook.
Strategically placed extra stitches help shape this lovely scooped neckline.

These two extra stitches help shape the neckline. Once you chain them, you work a double crochet in each to extend the row. Yes, it’s as easy as that! Your following row is two stitches longer and the neckline has a lovely gentle scoop.

Working the Front of the Pullover

The Front piece of the Light Touch Pullover is worked the same as the Back, just with a few less stitches which makes a deeper scoop to the neckline. Instead of two chain stitches at the end of Row 15, you work ten more stitches.

Both the Back and Front pieces flew off my hook so quickly that I decided to jump ahead and block them. I didn’t want to wait to finish the sleeve and then block all four pieces. I also love the satisfaction of seeing a beautiful piece all pinned out and ready to seam. It feels so close to done!

Half a gray crocheted sweater blocking on purple blocking mats, set on a wooden deck.
A lovely, sunny day will have your dry your crochet project very quickly! I set my blocking Back piece out on the deck to dry.

And off to Sleeve Island

Sleeve Island is where I’m headed next though. I’ll report back soon with details on how they’re worked, how they are seamed into the body pieces, and any tips I discover along the way.

Until then, have you ordered your yarn to start your Light Touch Pullover? Have you had a chance to start? Tell me in the comments below if you had to start over a couple of times too! It will help me feel better about my false starts.


Join our Crochet Along: Light Touch Pullover (May-June 2020)
A woman wears a lovely dark red crocheted sweater
Download the free pattern for The Light Touch Pullover

You are cordially invited to join us in our new Crochet Along Challenge, featuring the Light Touch Pullover.

About the Light Touch Pullover:

A detail of the Light Touch Pullover: the shoulder of the dark red crocheted sweater

This lightweight pullover exudes softness and feminine charm, featuring a subtle lace pattern composed of petal clusters. Open neck, gentle pattern curves, relaxed fit, and cashmere content of the yarn, all create a luxurious garment.

Light Touch Pullover is worked sideways in pieces. Front and Back are worked from centerlines to sides. Sleeves are worked from bottom up. This construction allows easy size adjustments if needed.

Choose your Yarn:

Made in: Capretta Superwash

You can also choose an assortment of other yarns by using our Light Touch Pullover Kit Builder (located at the bottom of the pattern page):

Just choose your size, yarn, and drag and drop the yarn color you want into the kit builder to instantly place the perfect amount of yarn into your cart.

How to Join the Crochet Along:

To participate in the Light Touch Pullover Crochet Along, join and post here:

CAL Timeline:

May 17: Order your yarn from crochet.com

May 24: Join the WeCrochet Ravelry group or Facebook Group to follow along with the Light Touch Pullover CAL discussion.

May 31: Download and read through the pattern. Make a swatch and connect with others in the groups.

June 7: Begin work on the sweater.

July 5: Finish your sweater, and don’t forget to share your progress on social media with #LightTouchCAL and #WeCrochetCAL


What I learned from the Brava Beanie CAL
Nine versions of the Brava Beanie hat crochet pattern laying on a table.
Sarah’s collection of Brava Beanies

I’m a new crocheter. I grew up surrounded by crochet—my mother did it, my aunts did it, my grandmothers did it, so naturally I rebelled and learned to knit. I have been knitting since the early 2000s and have really enjoyed it. I had an interest in crochet; I even bought some hooks but truly didn’t know where to start. I just wanted to skip all the learning parts and get to the point where I was crocheting little stuffed animals that made people “Ooooo”. 

The Brava Beanie Crochet Along felt like the moment to throw myself into crochet. The idea of making a hat felt more interesting than a dishcloth or afghan which as the two things people had suggested to me in the past to start with. Plus I already owned crocheted dishcloths and afghans made by my mom who continues to make me more on a regular basis. (Thanks Mom!) Hats appealed to me. I also liked that it was going to be a project for someone else, for a cause, for Warm Up America

Here’s what I learned from making my Brava Beanies:

1.) I don’t know what I don’t know and that’s ok

I started and frogged the Brava Beanie five times before I asked for help. I didn’t know what the pattern was saying when it said, “Rnd 1: Ch 1, 7 SC into the center of the ch-4 lp, join with sl st. 7 sts.” What?! I read this sentence over and over and it didn’t make sense. Where was I supposed to insert my hook? How was I supposed to Single Crochet 7 times when there were only 4 stitches plus a chain? 

I had learned how to make a chain, insert my hook in the chain, slip stitch and single crochet from the WeCrochet Youtube tutorials but I was still confused. Thankfully there were people around me that could sit with me and answer these questions. Sara Dudek, WeCrochet Brand Director, showed me where to enter my hook. Ah. 

At that moment everything became clear to me. I realized I was thinking too much like a knitter and needed to let go of any preconceptions I had. I realized that crochet was the jazz of yarn, you can do almost anything and put your hook anywhere.

I realized that crochet was the jazz of yarn, you can do almost anything and put your hook anywhere.

While there is structure with an end product as a goal, you can kind of do whatever you want. I learned that if something didn’t make sense to me, I just needed to seek help. I also found I wasn’t alone – so many people on Ravelry and Youtube were also there for me. 

2.) Embrace imperfections

After finally deciding to keep going with that first hat, I got excited as it started to look like a hat and then got a little frustrated. Looking at it, I could see all the times I messed up – I put my hook in the middle of a split stitch or where I inserted the hook in the top look on one stitch and the bottom loop on the other. Some of the stitches were tight and some were loose. I was annoyed but then it put it on my head for an afternoon. 

I took a deep breath and I made peace with it. It was still obviously a hat and was fine. I just learned this new craft, of course it’s not going to be perfect. It didn’t have to be perfect. Why did I expect to be perfect at something I just learned? It was going to be fine. 

I just learned this new craft, of course it’s not going to be perfect. It didn’t have to be perfect. Why did I expect to be perfect at something I just learned? It was going to be fine. 

3.) Trust the pattern

After doing one hat I decided I didn’t have to look at the pattern ever again. I went rogue and then ended up with a big circle and ran out of yarn. I begrudgingly looked at the pattern and realized that I increased way way way too much and lost track of where I was supposed to slip stitch and chain one.

On my third Brava Beanie, I didn’t use Brava Yarn and didn’t follow the pattern exactly. I truly wanted to figure out the pattern as if I was discovering it and not just following it. This hat turned out on the larger side because I increased too much yet again. Thankfully I made it with Alpaca Cloud so I purposefully shrunk it (by putting it in the washing machine and dryer) which made it extra soft and a lot more wearable. 

I started to really study the pattern and read it over and over to really set it to memory. Part of my problem with following patterns was having to look at it while working on it felt disruptive to the rhythmic flow of crochet. 

4.) Make it my own

After two more pretty successful Brava Beanies, I decided it was time to level up my skills. I first tried doing some ribbing which didn’t really work out.

The next hat I tried holding two yarns together which turned out well. This is the hat I’m probably most happy with as it just looks and feels nice and doesn’t have any noticeable mistakes.

For my next hat, I asked Sara to crochet tutor me in doing some ribbing which ended up looking really nice. You can hear this on the Bonus episode of the WeCrochet Podcast. Adding ribbing was exciting for me because it looked good and took my knowledge of crochet in a new direction, literally and figuratively.

I really enjoyed exploring the Brava Beanie pattern and seeing what I can do with it. It was a good excuse to use a lot of different yarns. 

Sarah's Brava Beanie hat

5.) Enjoy the process

Overall, this felt like the perfect first crochet project for me. I got to that zen moment of not having to work at crocheting and instead just enjoying it. I had a bad attitude about crochet for so long that I needed something like this CAL and open me up to it. Listening to Heather and Sara on the WeCrochet Podcast helped because they are always so inspiring about the learning the process. 

I also liked going on Ravelry and seeing other people sharing their Brava Beanies. There’s a special kind of magic that happens when you know that other people are making the same project at the same time.

I got to that zen moment of not having to work at crocheting and instead just enjoying it.

6.) I learned how to crochet!

The most important thing I learned from the Brava Beanie CAL was that I learned how to crochet! I learned how to hold my hook. I learned how to read a pattern. I learned how to make a chain, slip stitch, join in the round and single crochet. I made 9 Brava Beanies (8 that are wearable and one that is basically a big weird circle) with different yarns. I learned that I really like to crochet. I learned about myself.

Hear more about (Producer) Sarah’s Brava Beanie journey on the WeCrochet Podcast.


Join Our Crochet Along: Bobble Diamonds Throw (March & April 2020)
Join WeCrochet for a Crochet Along. Photo: Bobble Diamonds Throw. Crochet with us, March through April 2020.

You are cordially invited to join us in our new Crochet Along Challenge, featuring the Bobble Diamonds Throw.

About the Bobble Diamonds Throw:

The Bobble Diamonds Throw: A gray crocheted blanket with a geometric diamond pattern made in bobble stitches

This small throw uses texture and geometric shape to create a playful diamond pattern. Practice your bobble stitches while learning to read a crochet chart. You’ll find that both skills are easier than you expect!

How to Join the Bobble Diamonds Throw Crochet Along:

To participate in the Bobble Diamonds Throw Crochet Along, join and post here:

Bobble Diamonds CAL Timeline:


Join the Brava Beanie Crochet Along
A logo for the Crochet Along Challenge: The Brava Beanie, featuring 6 different sizes of crocheted hats in green

Let’s crochet the Brava Beanie together!

Quick Info:

What is the Brava Beanie?

The Brava Beanie is the ultimate crochet hat pattern! Written for six sizes, this is the ideal hat to make for charity projects, or as gifts. It’s simple and quick-to-make, giving you the freedom to dress it up however you like. We designed it for use with our value priced premium acrylic yarn, Brava Worsted (only $1.99 for 100 grams!), but you can use it with any worsted weight yarn.

The Brava Beanie is made from the top down in single crochet. Simple increases at the crown alter the sizing. Once you master this simple pattern, add stripes, tapestry patterns, spike stitches and more. With the many colors available in Brava Worsted, you’ll be able to make this hat uniquely your own.

Text: "Try spicing up your beanie with some fun additions!" A pile of 5 crocheted hats in different colors, with pom poms, stripes, and fur trim.

Customize the Brava Beanie however you like! You can add stripes, pom-poms, faux fur trim, or whatever you like!

Buy the Brava Beanie Project Kit:

A picture of the Brava Beanie Project Kit, which contains a printed Brava Beanie pattern, a green Caspian wood crochet hook, and a ball of Brava Worsted yarn.

If you want to get started quickly, choose one of our Brava Beanie Project Kits, which come with a printed version of the Brava Beanie pattern, a green wood Caspian crochet hook, and a ball of Brava Worsted yarn in your choice of different colors.

And of course, you can post here in the comments as well! Are you going to make a Brava Beanie??